Japan1964 Paralympic Wheelchair Basketball Tokyo, JapanJapan
by Michael C. Bryce

 

This was the second Paralympics and again it featured 2 divisions of basketball with again medals in each and no womens division. Again no individual player game statistics appear to have been kept. The games were held using some of the same facilities as the Olympic Games which were held one month earlier. These games as the 1960 Paralympics in Rome, Italy were outdoors on a wooden surface. The two courts used were located near the National Gymnasium Annex. There were two divisions. The Complete Division had players with complete lesions and the Incomplete Division had players with incomplete lesions. Players with complete lesions were able to participate in the Incomplete Division as well as the Complete Division. This was necessary  because sometimes a country needed them to have at least a 5 man roster. Only men participated in the 1964 wheelchair basketball event. Women made their debut in the 1968 Paralympics in Tel Aviv, Israel.

 

 

1964

Complete lesion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mmmmmmmmmm

mmmmmmm

mmmmmmm

mmmmmmmmm

mmmmmmmmm

mmmmmmmmm

mmmmmmmmmm

mmmmmmmmmmmmmm

 

 

 

GAMES PLAYED

WON

LOST

PTS FOR

PTS F AVG

PTS AGT

PTS A AVG

COACH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

gold

1

USAUnited States of America

5

5

0

284

56.8

76

15.2

Junius Kellog

silver

2

GBR

5

4

1

160

32.0

130

26.0

Ralph Hill-Jones

bronze

3

ISR

5

3

2

174

34.8

136

27.2

Shimon Shelach

 

4

FRA

5

2

3

196

39.2

152

30.4

Michael Boubee

 

5

PHIL

5

1

4

92

18.4

200

40.0

 

 

6

JPN

5

0

5

57

11.4

269

53.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

963

 

963

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

suggested scores (no games sheets provided)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

nov 9

 

USA

60

JPN

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ISR

41

PHI

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GBR

24

FRA

18

 

 

 

 

 

nov 10

 

GBR

33

ISR

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA

69

PHI

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRA

81

JPN

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ISR

18

NED

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA

61

FRA

24

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PHI

32

JPN

6

 

 

 

 

 

nov 11

 

ISR

45

FRA

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ISR

52

JPN

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GBR

43

PHI

16

 

 

 

 

 

nov 12

 

FRA

41

PHI

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA

45

ISR

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA

49

GBR

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GBR

44

JPN

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1964

Incomplete lesion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

final standings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GAMES PLAYED

WON

LOST

PTS FOR

PTS F AVG

PTS AGT

PTS A AVG

COACH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

gold

1

USAUnited States of America

5

5

0

248

49.6

106

21.2

Russ Churchman

silver

2

ARG

5

4

1

148

29.6

127

25.4

 

bronze

3

ISR

5

3

2

195

39.0

130

26.0

Moshe Hendelsmahn

 

4

ITA

5

2

3

147

29.4

122

24.4

 

 

5

GBR

5

1

4

88

17.6

188

37.6

Ralph Hill-Jones

 

6

JPN

5

0

5

70

14.0

223

44.6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

896

 

896

 

 

 

 

Suggested scores (no games sheets provided)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

nov 9

 

USA

53

ARG

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ISR

63

JPN

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITA

49

GBR

11

 

 

 

 

 

nov 10

 

ARG

17

GBR

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA

41

JPN

30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ISR

31

ITA

19

 

 

 

 

 

nov 11

 

ARG

23

ITA

22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA

62

GBR

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA

44

ISR

22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITA

31

JPN

9

 

 

 

 

 

nov 12

 

ISR

40

GBR

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARG

47

JPN

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GBR

41

JPN

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARG

45

ISR

39

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA

48

ITA

26

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tokyo 1964

With the success of the 1960 Games in Rome, Sir Ludwig Guttmann was keen to stage the Games again at the same venue as the Olympic Games in 1964, in Tokyo. Support for his plan was boosted by the positive reactions of Japanese observers who visited the 1960 Games in Rome. Based on their reports upon returning to Tokyo, and with the agreement of the International Stoke Mandeville Games Committee, contact was established between Guttmann and the Japanese authorities.

Further progress was made when a Japanese specialist, Dr. Nakamura, visited Stoke Mandeville to study rehabilitation methods. In 1962, two Japanese competitors took part in the 11th International Stoke Mandeville Games in England, and at the next games in July 1963, Dr. Nakamura brought along a team of specialists. On this team was Mr. Y. Kasai, Chairman of the newly organized Japanese Sports Association for the Disabled (JSAD) and a leading official in the Japanese government. Mr. Kasai later became Chairman of the Japanese Organizing Committee for the 1964 Paralympic Games.

Funds for hosting the Games were raised through donations from a range of organizations, in particular the public and private sectors of the Japanese economy. These organizations included: the National and Metropolitan Governments, the Japanese Chamber of Commerce, and the Professional Baseball Association and some 2,000 smaller contributors.

The Opening Ceremony was held at the Oda Field located within the Olympic village, with some 5,000 spectators. The patrons of the Games, His Imperial Highness Prince Akahito and Princess Michiko, were in attendance. The local and national press, radio and television responded with intense coverage, contrary to the Organizing Committee’s earlier worries that it might be difficult to create media interest because of the focus on the Olympic Games.

A total of 375 athletes (307 men and 68 women) from 21 countries participated in the Games. The largest delegation came from Great Britain, with 70 athletes, followed by the USA with 66. A significant addition was made at the 1964 Games—wheelchair racing in the form of a 60m race for men and women. Wheelchair racing has since grown into one of the most exciting Paralympic sports and helped to raise the profile of wheelchair athletes.

Several competitors turned in stellar performances—Ron Stein of the USA in Athletics, Margaret Harriman of Zimbabwe in Archery, Serge Bec of France in Fencing, and Dick Thompson of Great Britain and Daniel Erasmus of South Africa in Athletics. In all, 144 gold medals were presented during the Games, with the USA, Great Britain and Italy at the top of the medal table.

A capacity crowd of 5,000 cheered the competitors at the Closing Ceremony on 12 November in the National Gymnasium. In attendance were the Crown Prince and Princess, Sir Guttmann, the representative of the Prime Minster of Japan, the Minster of Health and the Governor of Tokyo.

1964 Tokyo (Japan) MEDAL Totals

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 USA 50 41 31 122
2 Great Britain 18 23 19 60
3 Italy 14 15 24 53
4 Australia 11 11 8 30
5 Rhodesia 10 5 2 17
6 South Africa 8 8 3 19
7 Israel 7 3 10 20
8 Argentina 6 15 16 37
9 Germany 5 2 3 10
10 Netherlands 4 6 3 13
11 France 4 2 4 10
12 Austria 4 1 4 9
13 Japan 1 5 3 9
14 Belgium 1 0 2 3
15 Switzerland 0 1 0 1
16 Malta 0 0 2 2
17 Sweden 0 0 1 1

Tip Thiboutot and the late Stan Labanowich have brought wheelchair basketball's rich, 65-plus-year history to life, from its humble beginnings to the World Championships in Birmingham, England, in Wheelchairs Can Jump! Summaries of international medal matches played at the quadrennial Paralympic Games and the World Championships (formerly the Gold Cup) are relayed in vivid and descriptive detail. 
 
This definitive reference guide is the go-to source for all information on the world of wheelchair basketball, including detailed descriptions-complete with diagrams and figures-of rules, tactics, and equipment. The authors have recognized outstanding achievements both on the court and in the boardroom with comprehensive lists of the players, coaches, and administrators who planned and competed in the above tournaments. This book is the first such compilation of its kind in the realm of wheelchair basketball. The volume contains color photos of some of the most exciting moments in the sport and features many of the superstars who have defined how the game is played. 
 
Discover the fascinating story of one of the most spectacular and dynamic movements in sports for athletes with disabilities, written by two men who dedicated their lives to the sport and witnessed the evolution of wheelchair basketball firsthand. With extensive commentary and input from leading authorities in the field, Wheelchairs Can Jump! is the most complete and thorough history of the sport of wheelchair basketball to date. 
 

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