Great BritainThe 2012 Summer Paralympic Games XIV   London, EnglandGreat Britain

The German team celebrate winning the gold medal in women's Wheelchair Basketball

The German team celebrate winning the gold medal in the women's Wheelchair Basketball on Day 9 of the London 2012 Paralympic Games at the Basketball Arena.

In front of an impressive crowd of 12,985 inside the North Greenwich Arena, the silver medallists from Beijing 2008 went one better as they pulled away from a tenacious Australian team late on. With their men in tomorrow's final against Canada, Australia had hoped this would be the first part of a glorious double, and they burst into a 10-4 lead in the first quarter.

But Mareike Aderman's free throws sparked a 10-0 Germany run to give them a lead they never surrendered. Not that Australia made it easy in a tough scrap. Several times Germany thought they had broken free only to see the Gliders come back.

Gesche Schuenemann had the first points of the third quarter to make it 30-19, but Australia responded to bring it back to 32-26 on a big three from Kylie Gauci.

They cut the gap to four early in the fourth, but then watched Germany ruthlessly pull clear down the stretch, with a 6-0 run making it 52-40 on Adermann's shot with 3:17 to go. Adermann led Germany with 19 points while Annika Zeyen had 12 and Marina Mohnen 11.

Gauci had 15 points for Australia, who also moved one step up the podium after taking bronze in Beijing. 'It is amazing,' said Adermann. 'I can't realise it right now. It was an awesome game. We just pulled it together. We played as a team and it worked. 'For sure, it is the biggest day [of my career].'

Earlier, Inge Huitzing and Mariska Beijer led the Netherlands to bronze, combining to score 53 points in their 71-47 win over the Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 champions the USA. Huitzing had 26 points and Beijer 27 as they led virtually throughout.

'I was really excited at the beginning of the tournament and now as bronze medal winners I am so, so excited,' said the 21-year-old Beijer, playing in her first Paralympic Games.'It was fantastic playing here. I have never played before such a big crowd before and to beat the gold medal winners from Beijing is just amazing.'

Thursday August 30 2012

Game 1 MEN      TURKEY (TUR) 59 United States of America USA  50

The 59-50 win was a first-ever Turkish win against the gold medal favourite USA in the sport, and it gave the field an early shake-up. Victory Day in Turkey marks the Battle of Dumlupinar, a decisive moment in the Turkish War of Independence in 1922, and forward Ismail Ar was delighted to add to the party. 'It's Turkey's glorious day, so it's a glorious day for us,' he said. 'I'm not surprised that we beat the USA today.' Cem Gezinci scored 15 points to lead Turkey to victory as they took an early lead and then put the USA under pressure.'This is only the beginning,' coach Mehmut Onut said. 'This is the first game and it is only one win. We want to continue this during the tournament and hopefully this will pay off in the later matches.' Joe Chambers with 17 points lead the USA.

Game 2 MEN   Spain SPAIN (ESP) 67  Italy ITALY (ITA) 40

Also in Group A, Diego De Paz Pazo scored 18 points to lead Spain to a 67-40 win over Italy. Spain had a very balanced attack with 5 players in double digits. Asier Garcia Pereiro added 12, Alejandro Zarzuela Beltran, Ismael Garcia Pereiro and Rafa Muino Gamez added 10 points each for Spain.   Fabio Raimondi and Matteo Cavagnini led Italy with 8 points each.

Game 3 WOMEN   Netherlands NEDERLAND (NED) 62   Great Britain GREAT BRITAIN  (GBR) 35

Mariska Beijer scored 26 points, 16 of them in the second half, and grabbed 19 rebounds as the Netherlands beat hosts Great Britain 62-35.  The Nederlands where also led by I Huitzing with 16 points and B Van Bergen with 10.  Nineteen year old Amy Conroy led the GBR attack with a strong 15 points in her first ever paralympic game.

Game 4 MEN      CANADA (CAN) 68   Japan JAPAN (JPN) 53

An incredible scoring surge saw Patrick Anderson account for Canada's first 23 points in a 68-53 win over Japan. Anderson, who announced his retirement after the 2008 Paralympics only to return in 2011, finished with 32 points in the win. Reo Fujimoto led the Japanese with 16 points and Hiroaki Kozai added 9.

Game 5  WOMEN    United States of America USA  63  France FRANCE (FRA) 24

In the women's competition, the USA did what their male counterparts could not and cruised to victory, beating France 63-24. Becca Murray led the USA charge with 23 points. Desi Millar in her first Paralympic game added another 14 points for the victors. Angelique  Quemener-Pichon with 7 points and Fabienne  Saint-Omer Delepine with 6 points led France both playing in their first Paralymic game.

Game 6 MEN    POLAND (POL) 63  Colombia (COL)  45

Captain Marcin Balcerowski and Mateusz Filipski had 18 points each as Poland overcame Colombia 63-45. Both teams enjoyed their first appearance in Paralympic wheelchair basketball. The Colombia team which had qualified by finishing the qualifying 2011 tournament ahead of Canada, Mexico, Argentina and Brazil were led by Nelson Sanz Londono with 21 points.

Game 7  WOMEN Australia AUSTRALIA (AUS) 52  Brazil BRASIL (BRA) 50

Australia opened with a tough 52-50 win over Brazil, holding off the South Americans in a tense finish. The Brazilians had matched the Aussies basket for basket throughout the game. Cobi Crispin with 18 points and Nineteen year old Amber Merritt playing her first paralympic game with another 16 points led the Aussie attack. The surprising Brazilians led by Lia Maria Soares Martins led all scorers with 27 points. She was flanked by Debora Cristina Guimaraes da Costa with 11 points and Lucicleia da Costa E Costa with another 10 points.

OVERTIMEGame 8 MEN OVERTIMEGermany Germany (GER) 77  Great BritainGreat Britain (GBR) 72 

Germany blew an 18-point lead but then recovered to beat hosts Great Britain 77-72 in overtime in the outstanding Group B contest of the day. Germany had led 34-16 in the second quarter on a Jan Haller basket, but a 28-9 Britain run gave them a 44-43 lead in the third period. The two teams scrapped it out to a tense finish, with Terry Bywater's last-gasp effort off-target to leave it tied at 66-66 at the end of regulation. Germany then dominated the extra period to take the win, thanks in large part to Dirk Passiwan, who scored 22 of his 26 points in the second half to hold off the British charge. 

Game 9  WOMEN  ChinaChina (CHN) 53    Mexico Mexico (MEX) 46

Cheng Haizhen had 19 points to lead China to a 53-46 victory over Mexico. Mexico had held the lead throughout most of the game only to lose it in the last 5 minutes. Mexico were led by a threesome of double digit scorers. Floralia Estrada Bernal led their charge with 18 points. Lucia Vazquez Delgadillo added 10 as did Anasia Perez Pacheco.

Game 10 MEN  AustraliaAUSTRALIA (AUS) 93   South AfricaSOUTH AFRICA (RSA)  39

Justin Eveson had 21 points and Shaun Norris added 17 as Australia beat South Africa 93-39. Richard Nortje led South Africa with 14 points.

Friday August 31 2012

Game 11 MEN           Germany Germany (GER) 59       Columbia (COL) 46
Game 12 MEN            Poland (POL) 78           Japan Japan (JPN) 53
Game 13 WOMEN     Australia Australia (AUS) 51          Great BritainGreat Britain (GBR) 24
 
Game14 WOMEN     Germany Germany (GER) 54       United States of America USA 48
Game 15 MEN           Spain Spain (ESP) 74              South Africa South Africa (RSA) 50
Game 16 MEN           United States of America USA  77                    Italy Italy (ITA) 51
Game 17 MEN           Australia Australia (AUS)  71       Turkey (TUR) 64
Game 18 WOMEN     Netherlands Nederland (NED) 70     Canada (CAN) 59
Game 19 WOMEN     China China (CHN) 72             France France (FRA) 34
Game 20 MEN          Canada (CAN) 70         Great Britain Great Britain (GBR) 54

  Saturday September 1  2012  

Game 21 WOMEN      United States of AmericaUSA 67                       MexicoMexico (MEX) 33
Game 22 MEN             Turkey (TUR) 65       Italy Italy (ITA) 60
Game 23 WOMEN     Great BritainGreat Britain (GBR) 42 BrazilBrasil (BRA) 37
Game 24 MEN          United States of AmericaUSA 91                   South Africa South Africa (RSA) 29
Game 25 WOMEN     Germany Germany (GER) 76    France France (FRA) 32
GAME 26 MEN         Germany Germany (GER) 64    Japan Japan (JPN)  49
GAME 27 WOMEN   Canada (CAN)  57      Australia Australia (AUS)  50
GAME 28 MEN           Great Britain Great Britain (GBR) 81 Columbia (COL) 41
GAME 29 MEN         Australia Australia (AUS) 75      Spain Spain (ESP) 59 
GAME 30 MEN         Canada (CAN) 83       Poland (POL) 65

Sunday September 2 2012

Game 31 WOMEN      Germany Germany (GER) 56     China China (CHN) 50 
Game 32 MEN           Japan Japan (JPN) 63           Columbia (COL) 49
Game 33 WOMEN     MexicoMexico (MEX) 50       France France (FRA) 42
GAME 34 MEN           Italy Italy (ITA) 61            South Africa South Africa (RSA) 32
GAME 35 WOMEN    Canada (CAN)  65      BrazilBrasil (BRA) 51 
    
GAME 36 MEN         Canada (CAN) 73        Germany Germany (GER) 66  
GAME 37 MEN         Great Britain Great Britain (GBR) 87 Poland (POL) 58
GAME 38 MEN         Australia Australia (AUS) 65        United States of AmericaUSA  49
GAME 39 MEN         Spain Spain (ESP) 67           Turkey (TUR) 64
GAME 40 WOMEN    Australia Australia (AUS) 58   Netherlands Nederland (NED) 49

Monday September 3 2012

GAME 41 WOMEN        Germany Germany (GER) 68  MexicoMexico (MEX) 28
GAME 42 MEN            Canada (CAN) 68      Columbia (COL) 42
GAME 43 WOMEN       Canada (CAN)  67     Great BritainGreat Britain (GBR) 50
GAME 44 WOMEN OVERTIMEUnited States of AmericaUSA 68   China China (CHN) 65 OVERTIME
GAME 45 MEN              Australia Australia (AUS) 68     Italy Italy (ITA) 48
GAME 46 MEN              Great Britain Great Britain (GBR) 71 Japan Japan (JPN) 55
GAME 47 WOMEN          Netherlands Nederland (NED) 55   BrazilBrasil (BRA) 42
GAME 48 MEN              Turkey (TUR) 79       South Africa South Africa (RSA) 54
GAME 49 MEN                  Germany Germany (GER) 73   Poland (POL) 63
GAME 50 MEN                   United States of AmericaUSA 63                  Spain Spain (ESP) 55

WOMEN GROUP A (final standings)

1. Australia (3-1)
2. Nederlands (3-1)
3. Canada (3-1)
4. Great Britain (1-3)
5. Brazil (0-4)

Women Group B (final standings)

1. Germany (4-0)
2. USA (3-1)
3. China (2-2)
4. Mexico (1-3)
5. France (0-4)

Tuesday September 4 2012

Game 51 Women            9 & 10 Place   BrazilBrasil (BRA) 59        France France (FRA) 35
Game 52 Women            Quarter FinalsAustralia Australia (AUS) 62     MexicoMexico (MEX) 37
Game 53 Women            Quarter Finals Netherlands Nederland (NED) 59  China China (CHN) 37
Game 54 Women            Quarter Finals  Germany Germany (GER) 55 Great BritainGreat Britain (GBR) 44
Game 55 Women            Quarter Finals  United States of AmericaUSA 67                 Canada (CAN)  55

Wednesday September 5 2012

Game 56 Men                  11 & 12 Place  Columbia (COL) 83  South Africa South Africa (RSA) 36
Game 57 Men                  9 & 10 Place    Japan Japan (JPN) 64        Italy Italy (ITA) 60
Game 58 Men               Quarter Finals United States of AmericaUSA 57                 Germany Germany (GER) 46
Game 59 Men               Quarter FinalsGreat Britain Great Britain (GBR) 75 Turkey (TUR) 70
Game 60 Men               Quarter FinalsCanada (CAN) 77       Spain Spain (ESP) 51
Game 61 Men               Quarter FinalsAustralia Australia (AUS) 76      Poland (POL) 53

Thursday September 6 2012
Game 62 Women           5-8 Placing    Canada (CAN)  74   MexicoMexico (MEX) 53
Game 63 Women          
5-8 Placing    China China (CHN) 72       Great BritainGreat Britain (GBR) 55
Game 64 Women            Semi Finals   Australia Australia (AUS) 40    United States of AmericaUSA 39
Game 65 Women           
Semi Finals   Germany Germany (GER) 49  Netherlands Nederland (NED) 46
Game 66 Men                Semi Final     Australia Australia (AUS) 72     United States of AmericaUSA 63
Game 67 Men               
Semi Finals   Canada (CAN)  69     Great Britain Great Britain (GBR) 52

Friday September 7 2012

Game 68 Women             7 & 8 place   Great BritainGreat Britain (GBR) 59 MexicoMexico (MEX) 53
Game 69 Women               5 & 6  Place China China (CHN) 73         Canada (CAN)  70
Game 70 Men                 5-8 Placing   Germany Germany (GER) 81    Poland (POL) 66
Game 71 Men                 5-8 Placing    Spain Spain (ESP)  86      Turkey (TUR)  78

Game 72 Women         BRONZE MEDAL WINNER   Netherlands Nederland (NED) 71 USA United States of America 47

Game 73 Women         GOLD MEDALGermany Germany (GER) 58  SILVER MEDALAustralia Australia (AUS)  44

Saturday September 8 2012

Game 77 MEN            GOLD MEDAL Canada (CAN)  64   SILVER MEDALAustralia Australia (AUS)  58

Game 76 MEN            BRONZE MEDAL WINNER  USA United States of America 61  Great Britain Great Britain (GBR) 46
Game 75 Men                  5 & 6 Place     Spain Spain (ESP) 67       Germany Germany (GER) 48  
Game 74 Men                  7 & 8 Place    Turkey (TUR) 76    Poland (POL) 74

 


e 2012 Summer Paralympics, the fourteenth Summer Paralympic Games, and also more generally known as the London 2012 Paralympic Games, was a major international multi-sport event for the disabled governed by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), that took place in London, United Kingdom, from 29 August to 9 September. These Paralympics were one of the largest multi-sport events ever to held in the United Kingdom after the 2012 Summer Olympics, and were the largest Paralympics ever: 4,302 athletes from 164 National Paralympic Committees participated.

The games marked the return of the Paralympic movement to its spiritual birthplace: the British village of Stoke Mandeville first hosted an athletics event for disabled British veterans of the Second World War to coincide with the opening of the 1948 Summer Olympics in London. Known as the Stoke Mandeville Games, they were the first-ever organised sporting event for disabled athletes, and served as a precursor to the modern Paralympic Games.[3][4] Stoke Mandeville also co-hosted the 1984 Summer Paralympics with Long Island, New York, after its original host, the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, pulled out due to financial issues.[5]

Organisers expected the Games to be the first Paralympics to achieve mass-market appeal, fuelled by continued enthusiasm from the British public following the country's successful performance at the Summer Olympics, awareness of the United Kingdom's role in the history of the Paralympics, and growing media coverage of Paralympic sport. The games ultimately met these expectations, breaking records for ticket sales, heightening the profile of the Paralympics in relation to the Olympics, and prompting IPC president Philip Craven to declare them the "greatest Paralympic Games ever."[3][6]

Contents  [hide

  • 1 Bidding process
  • 2 Development and preparation
    • 2.1 Venues and infrastructure
    • 2.2 Public transport
    • 2.3 Financing
    • 2.4 Test events
    • 2.5 Lead-up and promotion
      • 2.5.1 Handover ceremony
      • 2.5.2 Paralympic Day and Super Saturday
      • 2.5.3 Channel 4 television advert
      • 2.5.4 Royal Mail involvement
    • 2.6 Torch relay
    • 2.7 Ticketing
    • 2.8 Logo
    • 2.9 Mascots
    • 2.10 Opening ceremony
    • 2.11 Closing ceremony
  • 3 The Games
    • 3.1 Participating nations
    • 3.2 Sports
    • 3.3 Calendar
    • 3.4 Medal count
    • 3.5 Multiple medallists
  • 4 Broadcasting
  • 5 Controversies
    • 5.1 Atos involvement
    • 5.2 Ticketing
    • 5.3 British television coverage
    • 5.4 American television coverage
  • 6 See also
  • 7 References
  • 8 External links

[edit]

Bidding process

Main article: Bids for the 2012 Summer Olympics

As part of a formal agreement between the International Paralympic Committee and the International Olympic Committee established in 2001, the winner of the bid for the 2012 Summer Olympics was also to host the 2012 Summer Paralympics.[7] At the 117th IOC Session in Singapore, the rights to host the 2012 Summer Olympics and Paralympics were awarded to London.[8][9]

2012 Summer Olympics bidding results

City

NOC

Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Round 4

 

London

 Great Britain

22

27

39

54

 

Paris

 France

21

25

33

50

 

Madrid

 Spain

20

32

31

 

New York City

 United States

19

16

 

Moscow

 Russia

15

 

 

Development and preparation

Main article: 2012 Summer Olympic development

As with the Olympics, the 2012 Summer Paralympics were overseen by LOCOG and the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA). LOCOG was responsible for overseeing the staging of the games, while the ODA dealt with infastructure and venues.

The Government Olympic Executive (GOE) within the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) was the lead Government body for coordinating the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics. The GOE reported through the DCMS Permanent Secretary to the Minister for Sports and the Olympics Hugh Robertson. It focused on oversight of the Games, cross-programme management and the London 2012 Olympic Legacy.

[edit]

Venues and infrastructure

The Brands Hatch circuit hosted road cycling during the Paralympics.

Further information: Venues of the 2012 Summer Olympics and Paralympics

The 2012 Summer Paralympics used many of the same venues as the 2012 Summer Olympics, along with several new locations such as Eton Manor for wheelchair tennis and Brands Hatch for road cycling.[10] London's purpose-built Olympic venues and facilities, including the Olympic Village itself, were designed to be accessible as possible so they could easily accommodate the Paralympics. Some venues also contained additional accessible seating areas during the Paralympics.[10][11]

[edit]

Public transport

See also: 2012 Summer Olympics#Public transport

Transport for London operated the Paralympic Route Network (a downsized version of the Olympic Route Network operated during the Summer Olympics) to facilitate road traffic between venues and facilities. The network provided 8.7 miles (14.0 kilometres) of lanes specifically reserved for Paralympic athletes and officials.[12]

Sevenoaks railway station was designated as the preferred station for spectators travelling to watch the cycling at Brands Hatch. Organisers chose Sevenoaks over the closer Swanley railway station because of its "existing step-free access and excellent transport links", and because Swanley did not yet have a wheelchair lift. Whilst organisers did not believe that Swanley would be able to have wheelchair lifts installed by the start of the Paralympics, the station finished their installation by early August 2012.[13]

TfL continued to operate its Get Ahead Of The Games website during the Paralympics, which provided updates and advice for commuters during the Games.[14] Prior to the Games, concerns were raised by TfL commissioner Peter Hendy that London's transportation system might not be able to handle the Paralympics adequately. He feared that the end of the school summer holiday (which falls during the Paralympics) would result in increased traffic, and that commuters might not heed traffic warnings or change their travel behaviour as they had during the Olympics.[15]

[edit]

Financing

Further information: 2012 Summer Olympics#Financing

 

This section requires expansion. (September 2012)

[edit]

Test events

Main article: London Prepares series

Several Paralympics-specific events were held during the London Prepares series of test events; these included the London International Goalball Tournament, and the London Disability Grand Prix (the first Paralympic sport to be held at the new Olympic Stadium).[16][17]

[edit]

Lead-up and promotion

A digital clock in Trafalgar Square, counting down to the opening ceremony of the 2012 Summer Paralympics

[edit]

Handover ceremony

The formal handover occurred during the closing ceremony of the 2008 Summer Paralympics in Beijing, when Mayor of London Boris Johnson received the Paralympic Flag from Mayor of Beijing Guo Jinlong. This was followed by a cultural presentation by Britain, which was similar to its presentation during the Olympics' closing ceremony. It featured urban dance group ZooNation, the Royal Ballet, and Candoco, a physically integrated dance group, all dressed as London commuters and waiting for a bus by a zebra crossing. A double-decker bus drove around the stadium, guided by Ade Adepitan, to music composed by Philip Sheppard. The top of the bus was open and folded down to show a privet hedge featuring London landmarks such as Tower Bridge, The Gherkin and the London Eye. Cherisse Osei, drummer for Mika, and Sam Hegedus then performed, before the top of the bus folded up into its original form, sporting multi-coloured Paralympic livery.[18] Both the Paralympic and Olympic flags were formally raised outside of London's City Hall on 26 September 2008. British Paralympians Helene Raynsford and Chris Holmes raised the Paralympic flag.[19][20]

[edit]

Paralympic Day and Super Saturday

2012 Summer Paralympic Medal, temporarily exhibited at British Museum

On 8 September 2011 Trafalgar Square staged International Paralympic Day, hosted by Rick Edwards, Ade Adepitan and Iwan Thomas, to coincide with a visit to London by representatives of the IPC. The event celebrated the Paralympic Games, showcasing and demonstrating the 20 sports that would feature during the Games (with some sessions also made inclusive to people with hearing disabilities). It also featured appearances by Paralympic athletes Oscar Pistorius (of whom a bronze statue by Ben Dearnley was unveiled as well), Ellie Simmonds and Sascha Kindred. British Prime Minister David Cameron and London's mayor Boris Johnson also appeared.[21][22] Two days later on 10 September, supermarket chain Sainsbury's and Channel 4 presented Sainsbury's Super Saturday, a family event at Clapham Common. The event featured showcases of Paralympic sports, and a concert featuring pop music acts including Nicola Roberts, Olly Murs, The Wanted, Will Young, Pixie Lott, Dappy, Sugababes, The Saturdays, Chipmunk and Taio Cruz.[23][24]

[edit]

Channel 4 television advert

To promote Channel 4's role as the official television broadcaster of the Games in the UK, Tom Tagholm (with input from the British Paralympic Association's Tim Hollingsworth) directed a two-minute long trailer for its coverage entitled "Meet the Superhumans". The advert aimed to change the public's view of the Paralympics, encouraging viewers to see the Games as an "event in its own right" rather than as an afterthought to the Olympics. Set to Public Enemy's song "Harder Than You Think", the advert focused on the competitive and "superhuman" aspects of Paralympic sport, while acknowledging the personal events and struggles that reflected every athlete's participation in the Games. "Meet the Superhumans" premiered on 17 July 2012, and aired simultaneously as a "roadblock" advert on 78 different commercial television channels in the UK (which included rival channels ITV1 and Sky1).[25][26]

The advert was met with critical acclaim: Adweek's Tim Nudd declared it "the summer's most stunning sports commercial",[25] while Simon Usborne of The Independent felt it was "an act of branding genius" and "a clear bid to bring the Paralympics from the sporting wings to centre stage."[26] The advert was seen by an estimated audience of 10 million viewers; Channel 4's marketing and communications chief Dan Brooke estimated that reaction to the advert through social media was double that of the première of the BBC's trailer for its Olympics coverage.[25][26]

[edit]

Royal Mail involvement

See also: 2012 Olympics gold post boxes in the United Kingdom

In August 2009 Royal Mail unveiled a series of 30 stamps (reflecting the 30th Olympiad) about the coming Olympic and Paralympic Games. They were released in batches of ten between 2009 and July 2011; each stamp featured an Olympic or Paralympic sport and the London 2012 logo.[27][28][29]

Royal Mail honoured Britain's Paralympic gold medallists by painting gold a post box in each of their home towns, and also feature them on commemorative stamps released throughout the Games—as it had done during the Olympics.[30] It originally planned only to release a series of six stamps with group portraits. However, critics felt that Royal Mail would be discriminating against Paralympians by not granting them the same individual recognition as their Olympian counterparts.[30] Olympic shadow minister Tessa Jowell was also critical of Royal Mail's plan, saying that the stamps were a symbolic aspect of Britain's celebration of the Olympics and that "it would be a shame if this important symbol was not offered to our Paralympian heroes as well."[31]

Royal Mail initially defended its decision, arguing that it would have been "logistically and practically impossible" to issue individual stamps for each gold medallist, since it expected the British team to meet or exceed its performance at Beijing of 42 gold medals.[30] However, on 15 August 2012 Royal Mail announced that it would now issue individual stamps for each Paralympic gold medallist.[31]

[edit]

Torch relay

See also: 2012 Summer Paralympics torch relay

A group of torchbearers in wheelchairs bringing the Paralympic flame through Canary Wharf.

The Paralympic torch relay began on 22 August, when groups of scouts (both disabled and non-disabled) kindled the four Paralympic flames on the highest peaks of each nation of the United Kingdom; Scafell Pike in England, Ben Nevis in Scotland, Slieve Donard in Northern Ireland, and Snowdon in Wales. The four flames were then brought down from each peak in lanterns. On 24 August the flames were used to light ceremonial cauldrons in their respective capital cities (London, Edinburgh, Belfast and Cardiff) during "Flame Festival" events. A total of 38 towns and cities also hosted "Flame Celebration" events over the bank holiday weekend, where community representatives collected a part of their nation's flame to bring back for their respective events.[32][33][34]

On 28 August a ceremony was held at Stoke Mandeville Stadium where the four national flames were united in a cauldron at precisely 8:12 pm (20:12) to form a single flame for the relay. The four flames were brought into the stadium by dignitaries, including English model Katie Piper (who began to campaign for burns victims after having acid thrown in her face in 2009)[35] and Scottish amateur boxer Jonjo Look (who had a leg amputated and replaced by a prosthesis following an accident filling a gas canister).[36][37]

The flame travelled a 92-mile (148-kilometre) route to the Olympic Stadium in a 24-hour relay, with 580 torchbearers working in teams of five. It travelled through iconic areas of London such as Abbey Road and London Zoo.[32] Poor weather caused a two-hour delay on the Wednesday before the Games; parts of the route were modified to help ensure it would reach the stadium in time, while a backup flame was taken straight to the stadium as a contingency.[38] However, as the opening ceremony's parade of nations took longer than expected, the flame was able to arrive at Olympic Stadium in time.[39]

The Paralympic torch was designed by Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby, who had designed the Summer Olympic torch. It was intended to have a "modern" and "innovative" look, and was constructed with an aluminium alloy skin that is perforated to help with heat dissipation and grip. The torch also had a reflective finish, allowing it to match its surroundings and provide better visibility at night.[32]

[edit]

Ticketing

2.7 million tickets were offered in total, including event-specific tickets and those granting access solely to the Olympic Park, along with multi-event passes offered for ExCeL London and Olympic Park that were intended to allow spectators to discover a variety of Paralympic events.[11][40] Unlike previous Paralympics, tickets were in extremely high demand, and the ticket allocation was increased from the originally planned 2.5 million. Whilst the period during the Olympics has historically been the busiest for Paralympic sales, 1.4 million tickets were already sold before the start of the Summer Olympics, already surpassing the total number sold in Sydney.[41] The high demand resulted in technical issues with the Ticketmaster-operated website, which led to complaints from users (via social media) who were struggling to order.[42]

On 8 August LOCOG announced that 2.1 million tickets had been sold (600,000 in the previous month alone), breaking the record of 1.8 million set in Beijing (1.6 million tickets were also distributed by the Chinese government).[40] IPC president Philip Craven congratulated London for this achievement, crediting it to "the insatiable appetite the public has for top class elite sport", and noted it would be fitting for a Paralympics held in its spiritual birthplace to have filled venues.[41] By the opening ceremony, 2.4 million had been sold, with the remaining 100,000 sold during the Games; 10,000 were offered each day. The last 800 tickets to the Opening Ceremony were distributed to police and the military, while Mayor Boris Johnson arranged for the distribution of 1,100 to members of London's youth athletics clubs.[43] Due to popular demand, a further 100,000 contingency tickets were released on 6 September (which included multi-event passes, and event tickets given up by sponsors and partners), along with 100,000 giving access solely to the Olympic Park.[40]

Organisers expected the first ever sell-out in the history of the Paralympics.[44] LOCOG's chief executive Paul Deighton remarked that "the interest in attending the Paralympics has been extraordinary from the start."[40] This success was attributed to the enthusiasm surrounding Great Britain's performance during the Olympics, fan interest in South African "Blade Runner" Oscar Pistorius (a Paralympic athlete who was the first ever double amputee to compete in the Olympics), and affordable prices.[40][45]

       

Table View

Bar View

Rank by Gold

Country

Gold

Silver

Bronze

Total

1

People's Republic of China

95

71

65

231

2

Russian Federation

35

38

28

101

3

Great Britain

34

43

43

120

4

Ukraine

32

23

28

83

5

United States of America

31

29

38

98

6

Australia

31

23

30

84

7

Brazil

21

14

8

43

8

Germany

18

26

22

66

9

Poland

14

13

9

36

10

Netherlands

10

10

19

39

11

Islamic Republic of Iran

10

7

6

23

12

Republic of Korea

9

9

9

27

13

Italy

9

8

11

28

14

Tunisia

9

5

5

19

15

Cuba

9

5

3

17

16

France

8

19

18

45

17

Spain

8

18

16

42

18

South Africa

8

12

9

29

19

Ireland

8

3

5

16

20

Canada

7

14

9

30

21

New Zealand

6

7

4

17

22

Nigeria

6

5

2

13

23

Mexico

6

4

11

21

24

Japan

5

5

6

16

25

Belarus

5

2

3

10

26

Algeria

4

6

9

19

27

Azerbaijan

4

5

3

12

28

Egypt

4

4

7

15

29

Sweden

4

4

4

12

30

Austria

4

3

6

13

31

Thailand

4

2

2

8

32

Finland

4

1

1

6

33

Switzerland

3

6

4

13

34

Hong Kong, China

3

3

6

12

35

Norway

3

2

3

8

36

Belgium

3

1

3

7

37

Morocco

3

0

3

6

38

Hungary

2

6

6

14

39

Serbia

2

3

0

5

40

Kenya

2

2

2

6

41

Slovakia

2

1

3

6

42

Czech Republic

1

6

4

11

43

Turkey

1

5

4

10

44

Greece

1

3

8

12

45

Israel

1

2

5

8

46

United Arab Emirates

1

1

1

3

47

Latvia

1

1

0

2

47

Namibia

1

1

0

2

47

Romania

1

1

0

2

50

Denmark

1

0

4

5

51

Angola

1

0

1

2

52

Bosnia and Herzegovina

1

0

0

1

52

Chile

1

0

0

1

52

Fiji

1

0

0

1

52

Iceland

1

0

0

1

52

Jamaica

1

0

0

1

52

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

1

0

0

1

58

Croatia

0

2

3

5

59

Bulgaria

0

2

1

3

59

Iraq

0

2

1

3

61

Colombia

0

2

0

2

62

Argentina

0

1

4

5

63

Portugal

0

1

2

3

63

Taipei (Chinese Taipei)

0

1

2

3

65

Malaysia

0

1

1

2

65

Singapore

0

1

1

2

67

Cyprus

0

1

0

1

67

Ethiopia

0

1

0

1

67

India

0

1

0

1

67

Saudi Arabia

0

1

0

1

67

Slovenia

0

1

0

1

67

Uzbekistan

0

1

0

1

73

Venezuela

0

0

2

2

74

Indonesia

0

0

1

1

74

Sri Lanka

0

0

1

1